The all-in-one Plant Spacing Chart and Guide

08.20.15

The all-in-one Plant Spacing Chart and Planting Guide

If you use row planting in your raised garden, you're missing out! You could be growing a lot more, without any extra effort.

Do not worry though, ambitious gardener. There's a better way and we're here to show you the plant spacing 'light'.

Below we'll give you a quick tutorial on plant spacing needs for different vegetables. We'll explain how plant spacing works best when growing in a raised garden, how you can effortlessly partition your garden into equal growing sections, and even give you a plant spacing chart you can share with friends, put on your own website, or just use for yourself so you can grow a garden so great, the Jones's will have to keep up with you!


Already understand plant spacing and just want to reference our spacing chart? Scroll to the bottom of this page.

Need a planting spacing grid? View our Garden Grid™ watering system here.


Here's what you should be doing: Plant by area, not by rows.

Row spacing is meant to giving you a walking path between plants, you shouldn’t be walking in a Raised Garden. When you grow a garden in a raised garden bed, the purpose of the bed is to condense your growing area to a point that you can reach all plants, without having to step into the growing area. That's why great raised gardens always have one dimension of 4ft or less. (i.e.  4x8 raised garden , 3x6 raised garden). The reason for this dimension is that an average person's arm can reach at least 2ft. So when you see a gardener with a raised bed that's 4ft wide, you'll know that savvy grower can always reach the middle of their growing area!

Since you don't need to walk in your garden, your soil never gets compressed, your plants don’t get squished, and your favorite pair of sneakers stay nice and clean.

Plant Spacing keep your shoes clean
It’s a win, win ... win!

So what do we mean ‘plant by area’?

Planting by area means taking a square section of garden, and dividing the length and width of that section by the plant spacing needs.
If you look on the back of a seed packet you’ll see two types of measurement:

  • 1. Seed/Plant Spacing
  • 2. Row Spacing

Now, we normally do not condone being wasteful, but we want you to take that row spacing number, and throw it away! You won’t need it. What you will need is the seed spacing/plant spacing number. You will use the seed spacing/plant spacing number to divide up planting sections to know how many seeds to sow.

Let's get started: First you need to make planting sections

Typically about 1 square foot sections are preferred. We say “about 1 square foot” because the thickness of a garden bed board will make the growing area of your garden just under an increment of 1 foot; but not to worry, your plants will never know the difference.

To make plant spacing easier, many gardeners will make a plant spacing grid.

  • 1st they'll measure their garden bed.
  • Then go out and buy materials such as wood or string and screws.
  • Then cut everything to length.
  • Then attach the pieces to the frame of their garden bed to make a grid.

If you don’t want to go through all of that hassle, we were nice enough to create a pre-assembled, tool-free plant spacing guide for you, and it just so happens to also be a garden irrigation system. It's called The Garden Grid.

The Garden Grid watering system

Next, let's figure out how many seeds to plant: 

We have our simple plant spacing chart below if you want to jump ahead and begin planting now, but if you want to know how we got the plant spacing measurements, stick right here!

We’re going to do a little math. Don’t panic! We promise it’s really, really easy.

  • Step 1: Locate the seed spacing number from the back of your seed packet. (We’ll use 3 inch seed spacing for this example)
  • Step 2: Divide the width of your planting section (about 12 inches) by the 3 inch seed spacing.
  • Answer: 12 inches across / 3 inch seed spacing = 4 plants across
  • Step 3: Repeat step two but for the length of your planting section. (Also about 12 inches).
  • Answer: 12 inches across / 3 inch seed spacing = 4 plants across
  • Step 4: Multiply your two answers together
  • Answer: 4 plants across X 4 plants across = 16 plants!
  • Step 5: Start planting! With 3 inch seed/plant spacing needs, you can grow 16 plants in a 1 square foot area.
  • Step 6: Keep planting! You now have the plant spacing formula for the rest of your garden!

For a little planting inspiration, try out this sample plant spacing layout we made for our 4x4 Garden Grid watering system. We also have salsa garden and salad garden planting layouts!

 Plant Spacing Chart Raised Bed Gardening

Now... what you have all been waiting for!

The Garden In Minutes Plant Spacing Chart

Find what you can grow the most of or find your favorite plants, but most importantly - get out and start growing!

Plant Spacing Chart
Vegetable Type Plant Spacing Per Square Vegetable Type Plant Spacing Per Square
Arugula 4 Oregano 1
Asian Greens 4 Parsley 4
Basil 2 Parsnips 9
Beans (bush) 9 Peanuts 1
Beets 9 Peas 9
Bok Choy (baby) 9 Peppers (Bell) 1
Broccoli 1 Peppers (Hot) 1
Brussel Sprout 1 Potatoes 4
Cabbage 1 Pumpkins 1
Canteloupe 2 squares per plant Radicchio 2
Carrots 16 Radishes 16
Cauliflower 1 Rhubarb 1
Celery 4 Rosemary 1
Chives 4 Rutabagas 4
Cilantro 1 Sage 1
Collards 1 Scallions 36
Corn 4 Shallots 1
Cucumbers 2 Sorrel 2
Eggplant 1 Spinach 9
Endive 4 Squash 1
Fennel 4 Swiss Chard 4
Garlic 9 Tarragon 1
Green Onions 16 Tomatoes 1
Kale 1 Turnips 9
Kohlrabi 4 Tyme 4
Leeks 9 Wasabi 1
Lettuce (leaf) 6 Watercress 1
Lettuce (head) 2  Watermelon 2 squares per plant
Melons 2 squares per plant Yams 4
Mint 1 Yellow Parma Onion (large) 1
Onions (bunching) 9 Zucchini 1

So there you have it! Our all-in-one, everything your need to know, plant spacing chart and planting guide. Planting by area was inspired and made popular by the concept of square foot gardening, if you want to learn more about square foot gardening, check out our other article on just that! Also, if you're still curious about setting up a planting guide with an integrated irrigation system, where you won't need any tools, check out The Garden Grid on our How it Works page! 


Our plant spacing chart is always growing. Have something you want added? Let us know in the comments below!

About the Author: Theresa Traficante

Theresa is the green thumb of GardenInMinutes and provided the inspiration for the Garden Grid™ watering system. With decades of gardening experience ranging from the temperate climate of New Jersey to the tropical climate of South Florida, Theresa has grown nearly everything in her gardens.

  • Kim Jensen Larson

    I appreciate the information! Beginner here.

    • Hi Kim!

      Glad our plant spacing guide for raised bed gardening was helpful! What are you most excited about growing this spring?

    • Bryan

      You’re very welcome Kim!
      Happy our plant spacing guide is helpful and being put to good use 🙂

  • Annie

    Huh? 9 bush beans in a square foot? Those bushes can get huge.

    • Hi Annie! We get that question a lot 🙂
      It sounds tight, but the plants do well in clusters. They will spread and get little wild looking, but you shouldn’t have any trouble growing that many per square. If you’re concerned about them taking over too much space (9 plants does produce quite a bit), 5-6 plants per square is fine too, 9 is the recommended max though.